Organize to Save America’s Wolves

Join us in our involvement and support of the Call of the Wild Campaign to save America’s wolves with The Center for Biological Diversity. Use the link below to request an outreach packet, including: 100 comment letters, 25 fact sheets, 1 copy of this campaign backgrounder, 1 sample script with talking points, and 2 addressed envelopes to send your comments back to The Center for Biological Diversity. If you request a packet and plan to collect signatures, please contact us at devon@howlingforwolves.org so that we can provide support and track involvement!

Brainerd Wolf Pack Meeting| 2/23

When: Saturday, February 23rd, 1 to 3 pm
Where: Brainerd Public Library, Brainerd, MN

If you plan to attend, please also RSVP here: https://goo.gl/forms/Yc2OcredxPpmWK263

Howling For Wolves is looking across Minnesota for people willing to join together to stand up for the wolf! As a part of this effort, we are working to establish supporter and volunteer groups called ‘Wolf Packs’ around the state.

This meeting will be held at the Brainerd Public Library and will be an opportunity for us to get to know each other, and learn about the current state of the wolf, things happening at the legislative level, current projects, and opportunities to get involved in outreach, education, and advocacy.

These meetings are for wolf advocates to get involved at the local and state level to communicate with lawmakers about the wolf in Minnesota. Members will be able to walk away from each meeting equipped with new knowledge, skills, and opportunities to help protect the wolf for future generations and serve as a knowledgeable resource to your neighbors and lawmakers. In between meetings, you may receive email communications about further action plans, legislative developments, or other related communications.

For more information, or if you’re interested in establishing a Wolf Pack in your town, email our Projects Manager at devon@howlingforwolves.org.

4th Wildlife Killing Contest in Minnesota

The FOURTH wildlife killing contest of 2019 is being held in Minnesota this weekend. Please share this alert and take action now. Our actions last week were highly effective, with one of the hosts posting a policy that they ‘do not sponsor or affiliate with hunting contests’ after receiving so many calls. Your calls make a difference! Thank you for taking action.  

 On January 25 and 26, a wildlife killing contest will be held in Madison, Minnesota, targeting coyotes and foxes.

Please contact the host of the event to politely remind them that wildlife killing contests are cruel, ineffective, and do not reflect Minnesota’s tradition of sportsmanship and respect for the outdoors, and request that they do not host or sponsor this event in the future.

4th Annual Predator Hunt (Madison, Minnesota). Host: Madison VFW Post 1656. Phone (320) 598-7498.  Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Madison-VFW-Post-1656-266815813348269/?epa=SEARCH_BOX

As you saw in the article “Better Off Alive” in All Animals magazine from The Humane Society of the United States, participants in wildlife killing contests compete for cash, prizes, and bragging rights for killing the most or the largest coyotes, foxes, bobcats, and other species, often using high-powered weapons, scopes, game calling devices, and spotlights. These gruesome events have nothing to do with fair chase hunting or responsible wildlife management. They do not reduce coyote populations (and may even cause them to increase), will not yield more game species like deer or turkeys, and will not mitigate conflicts with livestock, pets, or people. It’s nothing more than killing for fun and prizes, which Minnesota has demonstrated it opposes by passing strong laws against animal fighting.

Thank you for speaking up for Minnesota’s wildlife!

PRESS RELEASE: HOWLING FOR WOLVES CONDEMNS THREE WILDLIFE KILLING CONTESTS TO BE HELD THIS WEEKEND IN MN

PRESS RELEASE FROM HOWLING FOR WOLVES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 18, 2019
CONTACT: Dr. Maureen Hackett, Howling For Wolves, 612.250.5915, or Leslie Rosedahl at respond@howlingforwolves.org

Howling For Wolves condemns three wildlife killing contests to be held this weekend in Minnesota as cruel, ineffective, and disastrous for wildlife

(St. Paul) – Three wildlife killing contests will be hosted this weekend in Minnesota. These contests target coyotes and foxes.

West Metro Coyote Hunting Tournament (Watertown, Minnesota): Host-  Hollywood Sports Complex: (952) 955-2424
Buffalo Ridge Coyote Hunting Tournament (Marshall, Minnesota): Host-  Brau Brothers Brewing: (507) 929-2337
Minndak Coyote Tournament (Randolph, Minnesota): Host- Roscoe’s Roadhouse: (507) 263-5157

“Wildlife killing contests are cruel, ineffective, and do not reflect Minnesota’s tradition of sportsmanship and respect for the outdoors,” said Joe Wolf, board member of Howling For Wolves.

Hunts like this are unregulated – with no rules, and no limits.

“Killing contests are wrong for many reasons.

  • First, there is no place in a civil society for wildlife killing contests. These types of tournaments are disastrous to wildlife and the balance of ecosystems, and simply glorify violent behavior by encouraging killing simply for the sake of killing.
  • Second, organizers of these events often claim that they are helping to control predator populations. The fact is, this is not about controlling wildlife populations. This is about thrill-killing, a nonsensical, savage contest to see who can kill the most.
  • Finally, we need the fox to control infection diseases, including Lyme disease,” said Wolf.

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Howling For Wolves educates the public about the wild wolf to foster tolerance and to ensure the wolf’s long-term survival. Howling For Wolves opposes recreational wolf hunting and trapping and all wildlife snaring. We advocate for nonlethal prevention methods that reduce wolf-livestock conflicts and support current federal protections for the wolf.

St Cloud Wolf Pack Meeting| 2/9/19

When: Saturday, February 9th, 1 pm to 3 pm
Where: Saint Cloud Public Library, Array Community Room, Saint Cloud, MN

If you plan to attend, or are interested in learning more, please fill out this Google Form: https://goo.gl/forms/rwA3saJTbuD8w2773

Howling For Wolves is looking across Minnesota for people willing to join together to stand up for the wolf! As a part of this effort, we are working to establish supporter and volunteer groups called ‘Wolf Packs’ around the state.

This meeting will be held in the Array Community Room at the St. Cloud Public Library and will be an opportunity for us to get to know each other, and learn about the current state of the wolf, things happening at the legislative level, current projects, and opportunities to get involved in outreach, education, and advocacy.

Recommended: Bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone if you have one available. 

These meetings are for wolf advocates to get involved at the local and state level to communicate with lawmakers about the wolf in Minnesota. Members will be able to walk away from each meeting equipped with new knowledge, skills, and opportunities to help protect the wolf for future generations and serve as a knowledgeable resource to your neighbors and lawmakers.

For more information, or if you’re interested in establishing a Wolf Pack in your town, email our Projects Manager at devon@howlingforwolves.org.

Duluth Wolf Pack Meeting| 1/26/19

When: Saturday, January 26th, 1 to 3 pm
Where: Duluth Public Library, Gold Room, Duluth, MN

If you plan to attend, or are interested in learning more, please fill out this Google Form: https://goo.gl/forms/Nqy5eH4NSMqwlc9R2

Howling For Wolves is looking across Minnesota for people willing to join together to stand up for the wolf! As a part of this effort, we are working to establish supporter and volunteer groups called ‘Wolf Packs’ around the state.

This meeting will be held in the Gold Room at the Duluth Public Library and will be an opportunity for us to get to know each other, and learn about the current state of the wolf, things happening at the legislative level, current projects, and opportunities to get involved in outreach, education, and advocacy.

Recommended: Bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone if you have one available. 

These meetings are for wolf advocates to get involved at the local and state level to communicate with lawmakers about the wolf in Minnesota. Members will be able to walk away from each meeting equipped with new knowledge, skills, and opportunities to help protect the wolf for future generations and serve as a knowledgeable resource to your neighbors and lawmakers.

For more information, or if you’re interested in establishing a Wolf Pack in your town, email our Projects Manager at devon@howlingforwolves.org.

Wolves Regulate Their Own Numbers

A myth of wildlife management asserts trophy hunts are necessary to manage wolf populations and are for the good of the pack. Recent research demonstrates wolves effectively manage their own populations—no hunting required.


From the Wolf Conservation Center:

As apex predators wolves keep their own numbers in check.

Self-regulation in large carnivores like wolves ensures that the largest and the fiercest do not overexploit their resources.

According to a recent work published in OIKOS, population control is what distinguishes wolves and other “apex predators” from the rest. Wolves are highly social animals that live in well-organized family units called packs. Cooperative living gives wolf families a number of benefits. In addition to facilitating successful hunting, pup-rearing, and defending pack territory, cooperative living allows wolves to limit their own population – for example, they control the numbers within their group by only letting certain members breed. By self-regulating— they also help to keep their ecosystems in balance.

Wolf populations stabilize when carrying capacity is reached.

Since wolf reintroduction in Yellowstone over 20 years ago, the 2+ million-acre park has acted as a laboratory, offering scientists a deeper understanding of the complexity of that ecosystem, including the diverse pressures (beyond lethal control by humans) that manage wolf populations.

Because hunting wolves is not permitted within the Park boundaries, Yellowstone offers us a chance to see what happens to wolf populations when left undisturbed by humans.”


Click Here for the Full Story

NPS REPORTS SIX YELLOWSTONE WOLVES KILLED BY HUMANS IN 2017

From the Wolf Conservation Center:

YELLOWSTONE — Yellowstone released the Wolf Project Annual Report for 2017.

“According to the report, staff recorded six uncollared adult wolf deaths and they were all caused by humans. Five were killed during the wolf hunting season in Montana (one old adult, three adults, and one pup) and one, the 12-year-old white matriarch of the Canyon Pack, was illegally shot inside park boundaries and had to be euthanized by park staff.”


Click here for the full story

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